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Driving Forward ... with Partners

Driving Forward ... with Partners

America’s political system is a mess -- and it’s affecting the economy and infrastructure. In order to get America’s infrastructure back on track, leaders will have to cooperate and find solutions.

In a report chaired by the Center for Law and Finance at New York University and sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation, researchers surveyed Americans from around the country -- Republicans, Democrats and Independents -- and discovered that there was unanimous agreement that the private sector should work with the public sector to rebuild our infrastructure.  

Click here to read the report.

When private and public entities work together, it increases the chances for success. For example, V&M Star Steel received $250 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -- which led to an additional $650 million from other sources -- which was then used to complete projects improving American infrastructure. Public support for private endeavors gives both consumers and investors confidence.

Cooperation between the private and public sector, manifested by the federal government would greatly enhance efficiency. Just as people of differing political views must cooperate to move America forward, so too must workers in different sectors in order to achieve America’s economic goals.

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