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Duh

Duh

Remember last year’s State of the Union Address?

I'm not asking about the speech itself. I’m referring to the fact that members of Congress abandoned their usual, and frankly juvenile, practice of sitting with their own precious cliques – Republicans on one side, Democrats on the other.

They crossed the aisle to demonstrate unified support for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) who had been shot just a few days previously. It was a wonderful gesture. But the next day, things were back to hyper-partisan business as usual.

This year, No Labels is pressing every member of Congress to stop acting like middle school kids at their first dance… and start acting like the grown-ups we elected them to be. You can help by giving your senators and representative a kick in the seat of their pants and demanding they sit next to someone from the other party.

As you know, bipartisan seating is reform #10 of our Make Congress Work! action plan. It’s the reform that gets a “Duh” response from anyone who hears about it. As in, “Of course, they should sit together. It makes perfect sense.” Unfortunately, the fact that an idea makes sense doesn’t make it any more likely for Congress to act on it.

And to get the word out, we'll running a full-page ad in The New York Times (PDF). No Labels is being joined in its call for bipartisan seating by Third Way and the Ripon Society and is asking for other organizations to support the effort. Read our press release announcing this campaign here.

Click here to see the members of Congress who have signed on thus far to sit with members of the opposite party.

Last year, our leaders sat together at the State of the Union for the first time ever. Now it’s time to tell them to sit together again.

Related Posts

  • January 12, 2012
    Joe Mansour
    As you know, bipartisan seating is reform #10 of our Make Congress Work! action plan. It’s the reform that gets a “Duh” response from anyone who hears about it. As in, “Of course, they should sit together.
  • March 20, 2012
     
    By Rep. Jim Cooper (D-TN) Everyone inside the Beltway knows that Congress is in dire need of strong medicine, and 90 percent of Americans agree. Congress as a whole is less popular than it’s been since polling was invented. Unfortunately, too few of my colleagues are listening and focusing their efforts on healing the sick branch of government.
  • December 29, 2011
     
    Before they can begin work in Washington, D.C., newly elected members of Congress must swear to “support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic . . . bear true faith and allegiance to the same . . . well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.”

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