Press Pays Attention to No Budget, No Pay Hearing

Press Pays Attention to No Budget, No Pay Hearing

It has been a big week for No Labels. On Wednesday, March 14, we had a hearing in the Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs. That night, our own Mark McKinnon went on The Colbert Report to talk No Labels. Watch the clip below, and read on to see highlights of just some of the press we received. 

 

Lawmakers debate pay cutoff for budget gridlock - Associated Press

"This proposal is like a legislative scream," said Sen. Joe Lieberman, I-Conn, chairman of the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee, as he opened the hearing. "As everybody knows, the public's estimation of Congress is at historic lows. And there's ample reason why that is so. Congress is just not fulfilling some of the basic responsibilities that the Constitution gives us."

Click here to watch Rep. Jim Cooper on Fox News.

Support Heller bill on federal budget - Ed Powell, Reno Gazette-Journal

The more the committee hears that citizens are even aware of such a bill, the more they may listen and even feel obligated to vote on the bill. Please take a moment to investigate it yourself.

No budget, no pay - Las Vegas Review-Journal editorial

Certainly, the inability of Congress to do its most basic job of annually formulating a balanced budget, in advance, is beyond exasperating. Despite the risk that it could prove largely symbolic, enacting the No Budget No Pay Act is worth a try.

No Budget, No Pay Act - Bethany, RedState.com

Everything that is broken will need a first step to recovery, and I believe we have found it.  Now is when the hard work begins.  Spread the word!  Contact your Representatives in Congress and tell them that you want this bill passed.

The No Budget, No Pay Act Chris Weigant, Huffington Post

A good idea is a good idea, no matter which side of the political aisle comes up with it. Democrats shouldn't be put off by the bill, and should support it on its merits. To put it another way: election year grandstanding? I don't care. Pass this bill.

Three simple ways to make Congress work - John Avlon, CNN Contributor

“Some members of Congress complain that having their $174,000-a-year salary docked until they pass a budget would unfairly penalize them. But we need to apply some reasonable pressure to focus Congress' collective mind. No Budget, No Pay is a good place to start.”

No Budget, No Pay - Sam Rolley, Personal Liberty Digest

“If this body can’t find a way to do what we have been sent here to do by the American people, which is to cut spending and reduce our nation’s outrageous $15 trillion deficit, then we don’t deserve to get paid,” Representative Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.) said of the proposed legislation.

Commuters In Philadelphia Support Proposed “No Budget, No Pay” Bill - Jim Melwert, CBS Philly

This “no budget, no pay” bill certainly has its supporters here in Philadelphia, as people in Center City say there would be consequences if they did nothing but bicker with co-workers all day.

Details of No Budget No Pay - FOX News

You don’t get paid if you don’t do your job, so why should members of Congress get a paycheck if they don’t do theirs? That’s the thinking behind the No Budget, No Pay Act.

If Congress stalls, don't pay lawmakers - Salem Statesman-Journal editorial

Here’s an interesting approach for forcing Congress to do its work: Stop paying lawmakers if they fail to approve a federal budget on time.

‘No Budget No Pay’ bill gets a hearing - Ken Newton, St. Joseph News-Press

Legislation that punishes Congress for not doing its job will get a Senate hearing today, an indication the institution might see itself in need of reform.

No Budget, No Pay, No Labels? - Heather Rogers, Independent Voter Network

No Budget No Pay is an attempt to hold members of Congress accountable for their actions by withholding compensation if a budget is not agreed upon.

Should Congress Be Paid When Failing To Do Their Job? - Annabel Lee, Double Dip Politics

For people watching Congress and the budget problem, the question is simple. Why hasn’t this become law sooner? This is a bill whose time has come.

Speaker Beth Harwell Applauds Congressional No Budget, No Pay Act - The Chattanoogan

“We should demand better from our leadership in Washington. I encourage the entire Tennessee delegation to support this measure. I wholeheartedly agree with this legislation as it is time to restore fiscal responsibility to the federal government.”

Cooper's 'no budget, no pay' bill gains momentum - Elizabeth Bewley, The Tennessean

Eighty-eight percent of people polled think members of Congress should not be paid unless they pass budgets on time, according to a recent survey by the centrist group No Labels.

Bill Would Dock Congress for Failure to Pass Budget - Lauren Fox, US News & World Report

"It is a sad state of affairs that the only way you can get the United States Congress to do something is to threaten to take money out of their wallets," Heller concluded.

Cooper Touts “No Budget, No Pay” Proposal To Senate Panel - Matt Laslo, Nashville Public Radio

A crowd of government reform activists welcomed Congressman Cooper with rally-like applause. He, in turn, was startled by a request to address the group minutes before the hearing began. Cooper obliged, but then sat down before senators to deliver a serious message about tackling the national debt.

'No Budget, No Pay' Bill Pushes to Make Congress Work - Kenric Ward, Sunshine State News

Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Tallahassee, one of those co-sponsors, said, "Any small-business owner, financial planner or head of household will tell you you can't run an effective and efficient operation until you have a budget blueprint.

Can Congress be fixed? Some lawmakers think so - Ed O’Keefe, The Washington Post

“Our challenge is to find reforms that Congress will swallow,” according to Cooper’s prepared testimony. “The best reforms won’t work if Congress gags, but more palatable reforms must be strong enough to work. Congress is its own doctor; neither the President nor the Supreme Court can save us. If Congress won’t reform itself, I am confident that voters will.”

Congressional Reform Proposals for the 21st Century - Bill Galston, Brookings Institution

In short, we are at one of those junctures in American history when good government and good politics coincide. For your sake and for the country’s, we urge you to seize this moment—by moving to a mark-up for No Budget, No Pay and by giving serious attention to a broader range of congressional reforms.

Committee Fields Ideas to ‘Fix’ Congress - Emma Dumain, Roll Call

“In a normal year, reform efforts like [this] would have zero chance of becoming law. … This year, however, is different,” Cooper said. “Congress hasn’t been this unpopular since polling was invented.”

The “No Labels” agenda - Paul Owens, Orlando Sentinel

Until groups like No Labels start getting traction, nothing is likely to change in Washington.

Many like idea of cutting off congressional pay for budget inaction - Sean Lengell, Washington Times

The list of co-sponsors and endorsements is growing for identical House and Senate “No Budget, No Pay” bills introduced in December by Rep. Jim Cooper, Tennessee Democrat, and Sen. Dean Heller, Nevada Republican.

 

Related Posts

  • March 26, 2012
     
    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Republican Sen. Dean Heller said Friday that he views himself as a “no labels” lawmaker and called for bipartisanship in Washington in the latest sign that he is trying to position himself as a moderate ahead of the November elections.
  • February 9, 2012
     
    Polls confirm the disgust of a large majority of Americans with congressional dysfunction. The 400,000 members of No Labels are trying to do something about it through promoting nonpartisan changes in congressional rules to drive a more functional Congress.
  • March 14, 2012
     
    A Senate panel plans to review several options Wednesday that would revamp the rules and functions of the House and Senate (or — as we like to call them around here — the 2chambers). The hearing comes as Americans remain deeply pessimistic about Congress: One-third of voters approve of the way congressional Democrats are doing their jobs and just 23 percent rate the Republicans favorably, according to a Washington Post-ABC News poll released Tuesday.

Use the Toolkit

Citizen Toolkit

Click here to get all the tools you need to help make America work!

Use Toolkit

Problem Solvers

  • Andy Barr
  • John Barrow
  • Mark Begich
  • Ami  Bera
  • Sanford Bishop
  • Diane Black
  • Bruce Braley
  • Julia Brownley
  • Larry Buschon
  • Cheri Bustos