Problem solvers working together to end straight party ticket voting

Problem solvers working together to end straight party ticket voting

This week, two No Labels problem solvers came together to introduce legislation that aims to reduce the role of parties in the voting process. Rep. Charlie Dent (R-PA) and Rep. Jim Matheson (D-UT) introduced the “People Before Party Act of 2013” Monday to end straight party ticket voting in federal elections.

Dent and Matheson, who stand with 48 other No Labels problem solvers in Congress, continue to demonstrate their commitment to reaching across the aisle to solve problems.

Matheson and Dent's bill aims to change the way voters select candidates on their ballot. Instead of checking a single box that assigns their votes to candidates from one party, voters would select candidates for federal office individually.

“Voting is one of the most important rights and responsibilities of any American citizen,” said Dent. “This legislation will promote thoughtful decision making in the voting booth by ensuring that ballots are designed to ask voters to select an individual candidate rather than a political party.”

"Everywhere I go, people tell me how frustrated they are with the partisan bickering that overwhelms our politics today. This legislation is one step we can take to reduce the role of parties in our elections and encourage everyone to vote for candidates for each federal office by voting the person, not the party," said Matheson.

For more information, read this article from John Latimer of the Lebanon Daily News.

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