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Timeline: No Budget, No Pay

Timeline: No Budget, No Pay

December 13, 2011: No Labels introduces the Make Congress Work! action plan, starting with a proposal to withhold pay for members of Congress if they do not pass a budget and all spending bills on time.

The No Budget, No Pay Act is entered as a bill in the House by sponsor Rep. Jim Cooper (D-TN) and in the Senate by sponsor Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV).

February 29, 2012: No Budget, No Pay has 36 co-sponsors in the House and Senate.

March 14, 2012: No Budget, No Pay receives a hearing in the Senate. Click here to check out some photos from the hearing.

May 10, 2012: No Budget, No Pay is up to 58 co-sponsors.

June 23, 2012: No Budget, No Pay has 73 co-sponsors total.

November 6, 2012: Ami Bera defeats Rep. Dan Lungren on a message of “No Budget, No Pay.” Lungren single-handedly held up the bill in the House, refusing to give it a hearing.

December 31, 2012: No Budget, No Pay ends the 112th Congress with 95 co-sponsors in the House and Senate. The average bill in Congress from 1973-2004 had about 11 co-sponsors in the House and around 3 in the Senate.

Related Posts

  • July 25, 2012
    John Rigby
    South Carolina Lawmaker Supports No Labels Proposal to Withhold Congressional Pay for Late Budget and Spending Bills Last week Rep. Mick Mulvaney became a co-sponsor of the No Labels-backed No Budget, No Pay Act (H.R. 3643/S. 1981), which will suspend pay for members of Congress should they fail to...
  • May 13, 2012
    Lauren Gilbert
    Filibusters can become very theatrical at times. It takes a lot of emotion for someone to be willing to stand on the floor and speak for hours at a time without any kind of break. On occasion, they have even gotten violent. While we at No Labels would prefer the parties to work together, rather than actively antagonize each other as happened in a few of these examples, we thought it would be fun to review some of the most memorable filibusters of all time.
  • March 8, 2012
    Collin Berglund
    “Thank you.” Those words are rarely heard in the rough-and-tumble world that consumes Capitol Hill. But that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be. There are times when members of Congress deserve a “thank you” for true acts of courage. Now is one of those times.

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