Congressional Reform

A bill banning insider trading passed the Senate yesterday and is only waiting on President Obama's signature. "The message that lawmakers hope that the public takes away from the Senate vote comes down to this: Congress can work. Even amid stark partisan divisions, bills with bipartisan support can rocket through Congress, if members conclude that notching minor legislative achievements for both sides outweighs heading into an election season where voters, enraged by gridlock, throw all the bums out."

No Labels is high-fiving Congress for working together for the common good and for the country by passing the STOCK Act in a bipartisan manner -- the vote was 96-3 in the Senate.

Each week, No Labels profiles instances of substantive bipartisan legislation coming out of Congress. With hyper-partisanship and gridlock at an all-time high, we believe it’s critical to highlight bipartisan successes.

No Labels is high-fiving Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV) for proposing the “No Budget, No Pay Act.”

On March 5, 1841, the Senate introduced the first filibuster. It involved the firing of people working as printers in the Senate and lasted six days. It was only used after Senate leaders had exhausted other known methods of debate.

America’s leaders are playing the blame game -- and citizens across the country are bearing the consequences.

Read the recap of our proposed reform ideas, that if implemented will help make Congress work again.

The purpose of law is to create a framework of order that applies equally to all citizens. Yet America’s lawmakers are not always subject to the provisions that apply to the rest of us.

Upon election, America’s leaders make an oath to serve the people. Yet most Democrats and Republicans tie their hands with single-issue partisan pledges.

Continuing No Labels' congressional rules reform conversation, we propose Congress have monthly private bipartisan meetings with no media, no interest groups and no visitors.

Problem Solvers

  • Andy Barr
  • John Barrow
  • Mark Begich
  • Ami  Bera
  • Sanford Bishop
  • Diane Black
  • Bruce Braley
  • Julia Brownley
  • Larry Buschon
  • Cheri Bustos
  • Tony Cardenas
  • Robert P. Casey, Jr.
  • Joaquin Castro
  • David  Cicilline
  • Mike Coffman
  • Paul Cook
  • Jim Cooper
  • Jim Costa
  • Rodney Davis
  • John Delaney
  • Jeff Denham
  • Charlie Dent
  • Sean Duffy
  • Renee Ellmers

From the Blog

Meet the Co-Chairs