Month: September 2011

Senate to vote, again, on bill to fund government, disaster aid

The Senate returns Monday for a late-afternoon vote on a stop-gap spending measure to fund government operations, including a compromise proposal on federal disaster assistance. If the measure fails in either house, a government shutdown is possible by week’s end. And even if it passes, the compromise may be too late to stop federal disaster …

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Can this government be fixed? Three steps that might help

WASHINGTON – The third threatened government shutdown this year was narrowly averted. Congress’ deficit “supercommittee” is apparently on a track to nowhere. And there has been contentious debate but little action on the proposals to help the jobless. Can this government be fixed? Americans are increasingly frustrated by the disconnect between what they say they …

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CEO’s call draws some local reaction

Tapping into a growing frustration with the government and the ideologically driven views that shape public policy, Starbuck’s founder and CEO Howard Schultz recently launched a campaign promoting more citizenship and less partisanship. “America right now is sick,” Schultz said during a teleconference on Sept. 6. In what he called a “Conversation with America,” Schultz, …

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Lobbyists for bipartisanship want to change Washington politics

America’s political history is littered with the remains of movements trying to change the nature of the country’s two-party, winner-take-all system. Some of the most recent and most well-known challengers of the status quo were probably the Libertarian Party, the Green Party and the Reform Party. While they all managed to create some media buzz, …

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Time to tear down ideological walls

Four macro-factors have emerged over the past 20 years to contribute to the partisan stalemate now gripping Washington: ideological sorting of parties, campaign finance reform laws, the new media, and redistricting and geographical sorting. Today, the parties are ideologically sorted, resulting in the most liberal Republican now being more conservative than the most conservative Democrat. …

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