The House is governed by rules and procedures that concentrate too much power in the wrong places, be it the speaker’s office or small, ideological factions that hold the rest of Congress hostage.

When this happens, bipartisan ideas almost always die. Speakers must appease their ideological fringes rather than edge toward the political center, where workable solutions are usually found.

The proposals in The Speaker Project would change these outdated rules and traditions.

It is no pipe dream. A small bipartisan group of lawmakers can exert tremendous leverage by conditioning their January 2019 vote for the next House speaker on the kinds of rule changes No Labels identifies in The Speaker Project. This has happened before in Congress.

No Labels believes it must happen again. See below for the kinds of rule changes we’re after.

The Speaker Project Explained

In a suspenseful and uncertain election year, here’s one thing that’s certain: The U.S. House will elect a new speaker in January 2019.

A sample of the problems No Labels addresses in the Speaker Project.

Download the book to read about our proposed solutions.

Vacate the Motion to Vacate

The “motion to vacate” is a rule that allows any House member to demand a no-confidence vote of the speaker by the full House. The threat of such a vote puts tremendous pressure on a speaker to avoid bipartisan cooperation.

A Return to Regular Order

“Regular order” is mostly understood as the array of rules, procedures and customs that enable Congress to assess problems and solutions in a deliberate and orderly fashion. But “regular order” is a bygone relic in today’s Congress.

A Bipartisan Speaker

The majority party traditionally picks the new speaker, with zero help from the opposition. The next Congress should change the vote threshold for electing a speaker to equal the majority party’s total membership plus five.

The Speaker Project


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